Teologia Racional - Patonistas de Cambridge

- Rational theology and Christian philosophy in England in the seventeenth century (Volume 2)
RATIONAL THEOLOGY AND CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHY IN ENGLAND IN THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, BY JOHN TULLOCH, D.D.
CONTENTS OF THE SECOND VOLUME.
I. HISTORICAL POSITION OF CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL - PHILOSOPHY AND CHRISTIANITY.
Rational movement widens as it advances
The idea of the Church—the centre of first movement
Leaders of this movement real authors of religious freedom in England
Philosophical character of second movement
Superficial contrasts betwixt the two movements
Influences preceding and affecting Cambridge School
Diversity of religious sects and opinions
Ultra-dogmatic character of the Westminster theology
Rise of a new speculative spirit
State of thought and education at Cambridge
Bacon and Descartes
" The New Sect of Latitude-men," Pamphlet by S. P.
Platonic revival
Speculations and influence of Hobbes
Burnet's description of the Cambridge School
Fowler's " Moderate Divines of Church of England

II. BENJAMIN WHICHCOTE—REASON AND RELIGION.
Whichcote, founder of the new School, . His birth and education at Emmanuel College, Cambridge
His connection with the Puritans, His appointment as Provost of King's
His influence as a teacher and lecturer
His relations with the Puritan Doctors at Cambridge
Tuckney, Hill, Arrowsmith
Correspondence betwixt Whichcote and Tuckney
Whichcote as a leader of thought
His retirement from Cambridge after the Restoration
Appointed Vicar of St Laurence, Jewry
His death at Cambridge on a visit to Cudworth
Tillotson preaches his funeral sermon
His Discourses and Aphorisms
His Christian Rationalism of a deeper vein than any preceding it in England

III. JOHN SMITH—FOUNDATIONS OF A CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHY.
Connection of religion with philosophy
Growing speculative character of the movement
Smith a " thinker without a biography
Birth in Northamptonshire
Connection with Emmanuel College and Whichcote
Chosen a Fellow of Queen's College
His early death and character — Patrick's sermon on him
His lofty spiritual genius
His Select Discourses
Exposition of his religious philosophy
I. Method of Divine Knowledge
II. Superstition and Atheism
III. Main principles of Divine Knowledge, Immortality, and God
IV. Distinctive character of Christianity
Smith's claims as a Christian thinker

IV. RALPH CUDWORTH — CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHY IN CONFLICT WITH MATERIALISM.
Cudworth, the most celebrated of the Cambridge School
His birth and education at Emmanuel College
His first authorship—Discourse on Lord's Supper
His Platonic culture and acquaintance with the Neo Platonists
Appointed Master of Clare Hall, and Professor of Hebrew
Master of Christ's College, Connection with Cromwell, His prophetic studies
Continued at Cambridge after the Restoration, His ethical studies
Publication of his Intellectual System of the Universe
His death
His daughter, Lady Masham, and her connection with Locke
Examination of his merits— (1.) As a preacher, (2.) As a theistic thinker, (3.) As a moralist
His relations to Hobbes and Descartes
Central questions of his religious philosophy

V. HENRY MORE—CHRISTIAN THEOSOPHY AND MYSTICISM.
More's interesting character
His birth and childhood
His change of religious opinion as a boy
His education at Eton and Christ's Church, Cambridge
His temporary scepticism
His emergence into a "lucid state of mind"
His poems
His vision of divine things
His indifference to ecclesiastical promotion
His " heroine pupil," Lady Conway
His friends Van Helmont and V. Greatrakes
His supposed personal endowments
His happy days in the seclusion of Christ's College
His mode of living there
His relations with the Quakers
He is " above all sects,"—" a true and free Christian"
Period of his activity as an author
Classification of his writings
His ' Divine Dialogues'
His theosophic dreams
His beautiful and elevated mysticism
Estimate of him as a Christian thinker
His Rationalism
His Neo-Platonism
His credulity
His general theological opinions
His philosophical position in relation to Hobbes and Descartes
His correspondence with Descartes
His defence of the spiritual side of human nature
His hyper-spiritualism
His views as a moralist
Final estimate of his genius and thought
VI. MINOR MEMBERS OF THE CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL.
Nathaniel Culverwel, the most significant of the group
His education at Emmanuel College
His 'Discourse of the Light of Nature'
His reconciliation of reason and faith
Analysis of his views —
(1.) What Nature is ?
(2.) What the law of Nature is ?
(3.) What the light of Nature is ?
John Worthington, educated at Emmanuel College, and Master of Jesus College
His 'Miscellanies' and 'Discourses'
His connection with Whichcote
George Rust and his ' Discourse of Truth'
Edward Fowler and his 'Free Discourse'
Simon Patrick, his peculiar mysticism
Bishop Wilkins
Joseph Glanvill
His mixed credulity and anti-dogmatism
John Norris of Bemerton
His connection with Henry More
Sir Thomas Browne — the 'Religio Medici' and ' Christian Morals'